Kipling Friday

By Lord Byron:

When We Two Parted

WHEN we two parted
In silence and tears,
Half broken-hearted
To sever for years,
Pale grew thy cheek and cold,
Colder thy kiss;
Truly that hour foretold
Sorrow to this.
The dew of the morning
Sunk chill on my brow–
It felt like the warning
Of what I feel now.
Thy vows are all broken,
And light is thy fame:
I hear thy name spoken,
And share in its shame.
They name thee before me,
A knell to mine ear;
A shudder comes o’er me–
Why wert thou so dear?
They know not I knew thee,
Who knew thee too well:
Lond, long shall I rue thee,
Too deeply to tell.
I secret we met–
I silence I grieve,
That thy heart could forget,
Thy spirit deceive.
If I should meet thee
After long years,
How should I greet thee?
With silence and tears.

Kipling Friday

Yet another divergence from the standard Kipling fare offered here:

The Call of the Wild by Robert Service

Have you gazed on naked grandeur
where there’s nothing else to gaze on,
Set pieces and drop-curtain scenes galore,
Big mountains heaved to heaven, which the blinding sunsets blazon,
Black canyons where the rapids rip and roar?
Have you swept the visioned valley
with the green stream streaking through it,
Searched the Vastness for a something you have lost?
Have you strung your soul to silence?
Then for God’s sake go and do it;
Hear the challenge, learn the lesson, pay the cost.

Have you wandered in the wilderness, the sagebrush desolation,
The bunch-grass levels where the cattle graze?
Have you whistled bits of rag-time at the end of all creation,
And learned to know the desert’s little ways?
Have you camped upon the foothills,
have you galloped o’er the ranges,
Have you roamed the arid sun-lands through and through?
Have you chummed up with the mesa?
Do you know its moods and changes?
Then listen to the Wild — it’s calling you.

Have you known the Great White Silence,
not a snow-gemmed twig aquiver?
(Eternal truths that shame our soothing lies).
Have you broken trail on snowshoes? mushed your huskies up the river,
Dared the unknown, led the way, and clutched the prize?
Have you marked the map’s void spaces, mingled with the mongrel races,
Felt the savage strength of brute in every thew?
And though grim as hell the worst is,
can you round it off with curses?
Then hearken to the Wild — it’s wanting you.

Have you suffered, starved and triumphed,
groveled down, yet grasped at glory,
Grown bigger in the bigness of the whole?
“Done things” just for the doing, letting babblers tell the story,
Seeing through the nice veneer the naked soul?
Have you seen God in His splendors,
heard the text that nature renders?
(You’ll never hear it in the family pew).
The simple things, the true things, the silent men who do things —
Then listen to the Wild — it’s calling you.

They have cradled you in custom,
they have primed you with their preaching,
They have soaked you in convention through and through;
They have put you in a showcase; you’re a credit to their teaching —
But can’t you hear the Wild? — it’s calling you.
Let us probe the silent places, let us seek what luck betide us;
Let us journey to a lonely land I know.
There’s a whisper on the night-wind,
there’s a star agleam to guide us,
And the Wild is calling, calling. . .let us go.

Kipling Friday

The following is Ulysses by Tennyson:

It little profits that an idle king,
By this still hearth, among these barren crags,
Match’d with an aged wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,
That hoard and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
I cannot rest from travel: I will drink
Life to the lees: All times I have enjoy’d
Greatly, have suffer’d greatly, both with those
That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when
Thro’ scudding drifts the rainy Hyades
Vext the dim sea: I am become a name;
For always roaming with a hungry heart
Much have I seen and known; cities of men
And manners, climates, councils, governments,
Myself not least, but honor’d of them all;
And drunk delight of battle with my peers,
Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy.
I am a part of all that I have met;
Yet all experience is an arch wherethro’
Gleams that untravell’d world, whose margin fades
For ever and for ever when I move.
How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnish’d, not to shine in use!
As tho’ to breathe were life. Life piled on life
Were all too little, and of one to me
Little remains: But every hour is saved
From that eternal silence, something more,
A bringer of new things; and vile it were
For some three suns to store and hoard myself,
And this gray spirit yearning in desire
To follow knowledge like a sinking star,
Beyond the utmost bounds of human thought.

This is my son, mine own Telemachos,
To whom I leave the sceptre and the isle-
Well-loved of me, discerning to fulfill
This labour, by slow prudence to make mild
A rugged people, and thro’ soft degrees
Subdue them to the useful and the good.
Most blameless is he, centred in the sphere
Of common duties, decent not to fail
In offices of tenderness, and pay
Meet adoration to my household gods,
When I am gone. He works his work, I mine.
There lies the port, the vessel puffs her sail:
There gloom the dark broad seas. My mariners,
Souls that have tol’d and wrought, and thought with me-
That ever with a frolic welcome took
The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed
Free hearts, free foreheads – you and I are old;
Old age hath yet his honour and his toil;
Death closes all: but something ere the end,
Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods.
The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks:
The long day wanes: the slow moon climbs: the deep
Moans round with many voices. Come, my friends,
‘Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
Push off, and sitting well in order smite
The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds
To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths
Of all the western stars, until I die.
It may be that the gulfs will wash us down:
It may be that we shall touch the Happy Isles,
And see the great Achilles, whom we knew.
Tho’ much is taken, much abides; and tho’
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved heaven and earth; that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

 

Kipling Friday

As a proper sea-faring man, I find the following prayer penned by Sir Francis Drake moving.

Disturb us, Lord, when
We are too well pleased with ourselves,
When our dreams have come true
Because we have dreamed too little,
When we arrived safely
Because we sailed too close to the shore.

Disturb us, Lord, when
With the abundance of things we possess
We have lost our thirst
For the waters of life;
Having fallen in love with life,
We have ceased to dream of eternity
And in our efforts to build a new earth,
We have allowed our vision
Of the new Heaven to dim.

Disturb us, Lord, to dare more boldly,
To venture on wider seas
Where storms will show your mastery;
Where losing sight of land,
We shall find the stars.

We ask You to push back
The horizons of our hopes;
And to push into the future
In strength, courage, hope, and love.

 

Kipling Friday

The English Way

1929

After the fight at Otterburn, 
        Before the ravens came, 
The Witch-wife rode across the fern 
        And spoke Earl Percy's name. 

"Stand up-stand up, Northumberland! 
        I bid you answer true,
If England's King has under his hand 
        A Captain as good as you?"

Then up and spake the dead Percy-
        Oh, but his wound was sore!
"Five hundred Captains as good," said he, 
        "And I trow five hundred more.

"But I pray you by the lifting skies, 
        And the young wind over the grass, 
That you take your eyes from off my eyes, 
        And let my spirit pass."

"Stand up-stand up, Northumberland! 
        I charge you answer true,
If ever you dealt in steel and brand, 
        How went the fray with you?" 

"Hither and yon," the Percy said; 
        "As every fight must go;
For some they fought and some they fled, 
        And some struck ne'er a blow.

"But I pray you by the breaking skies, 
        And the first call from the nest,
That you turn your eyes away from my eyes, 
        And let me to my rest."

"Stand up-stand up, Northumberland!
        I will that you answer true,
If you and your men were quick again, 
        How would it be with you?"

"Oh, we would speak of hawk and hound, 
        And the red deer where they rove, 
And the merry foxes the country round, 
        And the maidens that we love.

"We would not speak of steel or steed, 
        Except to grudge the cost;
And he that had done the doughtiest deed 
        Would mock himself the most.

"But I pray you by my keep and tower, 
        And the tables in my hall,
And I pray you by my lady's bower 
        (Ah, bitterest of all!)

"That you lift your eyes from outen my eyes, 
        Your hand from off my breast,
And cover my face from the red sun-rise, 
        And loose me to my rest!"

She has taken her eyes from out of his eyes-
        Her palm from off his breast,
And covered his face from the red sun-rise, 
        And loosed him to his rest.

"Sleep you, or wake, Northumberland-
        You shall not speak again,
And the word you have said 'twixt quick and dead 
        I lay on Englishmen.

"So long as Severn runs to West 
        Or Humber to the East,
That they who bore themselves the best 
        Shall count themselves the least. 

"While there is fighting at the ford, 
        Or flood along the Tweed,
That they shall choose the lesser word 
        To cloke the greater deed.

"After the quarry and the kill-
        The fair fight and the fame-
With an ill face and an ill grace 
        Shall they rehearse the same. 

"Greater the deed, greater the need 
        Lightly to laugh it away,

Shall be the mark of the English breed 
        Until the Judgment Day!"

 

Kipling Friday

Et Dona Ferentes

1896

In extended observation of the ways and works of man,
From the Four-mile Radius roughly to the Plains of Hindustan: 
I have drunk with mixed assemblies, seen the racial ruction rise, 
And the men of half Creation damning half Creation's eyes.

I have watched them in their tantrums, all that Pentecostal crew, 
French, Italian, Arab, Spaniard, Dutch and Greek, and Russ and Jew,
Celt and savage, buff and ochre, cream and yellow, mauve and white,
But it never really mattered till the English grew polite;

Till the men with polished toppers, till the men in long frock-coats,
Till the men who do not duel, till the men who war with votes, 
Till the breed that take their pleasures as Saint Lawrence took his grid,
Began to "beg your pardon" and-the knowing croupier hid. 

Then the bandsmen with their fiddles, and the girls that bring the beer,
Felt the psychological moment, left the lit Casino clear; 
But the uninstructed alien, from the Teuton to the Gaul, 
Was entrapped, once more, my country, by that suave, deceptive drawl.

As it was in ancient Suez or 'neath wilder, milder skies,
I "observe with apprehension" how the racial ructions rise; 
And with keener apprehension, if I read the times aright, 
Hear the old Casino order: "Watch your man, but be polite. 

“Keep your temper. Never answer (that was why they spat and swore).
Don't hit first, but move together (there's no hurry) to the door. 
Back to back, and facing outward while the linguist tells 'em how -
`Nous sommes allong ar notre batteau, nous ne voulong pas un row.'"

So the hard, pent rage ate inward, till some idiot went too far... 
"Let 'em have it!" and they had it, and the same was merry war -
Fist, umbrella, cane, decanter, lamp and beer-mug, chair and boot -
Till behind the fleeing legions rose the long, hoarse yell for loot. 

Then the oil-cloth with its numbers, like a banner fluttered free; 
Then the grand piano cantered, on three castors, down the quay; 
White, and breathing through their nostrils, silent, systematic, swift -
They removed, effaced, abolished all that man could heave or lift. 

Oh, my country, bless the training that from cot to castle runs -
The pitfall of the stranger but the bulwark of thy sons -
Measured speech and ordered action, sluggish soul and un - perturbed,
Till we wake our Island-Devil-nowise cool for being curbed! 

When the heir of all the ages "has the honour to remain,"
When he will not hear an insult, though men make it ne'er so plain,
When his lips are schooled to meekness, when his back is bowed to blows -
Well the keen aas-vogels know it-well the waiting jackal knows. 

Build on the flanks of Etna where the sullen smoke-puffs float -
Or bathe in tropic waters where the lean fin dogs the boat -
Cock the gun that is not loaded, cook the frozen dynamite -
But oh, beware my Country, when my Country grows polite!

 

Kipling Friday

The Glories

1925

IN FAITHS and Food and Books and Friends 
   Give every soul her choice.
For such as follow divers ends 
   In divers lights rejoice. 

There is a glory of the Sun 
   ('Pity it passeth soon!)
But those whose work is nearer done 
   Look, rather, towards the Moon. 

There is a glory of the Moon 
   When the hot hours have run;
But such as have not touched their noon 
   Give worship to the Sun.

There is a glory of the Stars, 
   Perfect on stilly ways;
But such as follow present wars 
   Pursue the Comet's blaze. 

There is a glory in all things; 
   But each must find his own, 
Sufficient for his reckonings, 
   Which is to him alone.

 

Kipling Friday

Ford o’ Kabul River

Kabul town's by Kabul river --
 Blow the trumpet, draw the sword --
There I lef' my mate for ever,
 Wet an' drippin' by the ford.
    Ford, ford, ford o' Kabul river,
     Ford o' Kabul river in the dark!
    There's the river up and brimmin', an' there's 'arf a squadron swimmin'
     'Cross the ford o' Kabul river in the dark.

Kabul town's a blasted place --
 Blow the trumpet, draw the sword --
'Strewth I shan't forget 'is face
 Wet an' drippin' by the ford!
    Ford, ford, ford o' Kabul river,
     Ford o' Kabul river in the dark!
    Keep the crossing-stakes beside you, an' they will surely guide you
     'Cross the ford o' Kabul river in the dark.

Kabul town is sun and dust --
 Blow the trumpet, draw the sword --
I'd ha' sooner drownded fust
 'Stead of 'im beside the ford.
    Ford, ford, ford o' Kabul river,
     Ford o' Kabul river in the dark!
    You can 'ear the 'orses threshin', you can 'ear the men a-splashin',
     'Cross the ford o' Kabul river in the dark.

Kabul town was ours to take --
 Blow the trumpet, draw the sword --
I'd ha' left it for 'is sake --
 'Im that left me by the ford.
    Ford, ford, ford o' Kabul river,
     Ford o' Kabul river in the dark!
    It's none so bloomin' dry there; ain't you never comin' nigh there,
     'Cross the ford o' Kabul river in the dark?

Kabul town'll go to hell --
 Blow the trumpet, draw the sword --
'Fore I see him 'live an' well --
 'Im the best beside the ford.
    Ford, ford, ford o' Kabul river,
     Ford o' Kabul river in the dark!
    Gawd 'elp 'em if they blunder, for their boots'll pull 'em under,
     By the ford o' Kabul river in the dark.

Turn your 'orse from Kabul town --
 Blow the trumpet, draw the sword --
'Im an' 'arf my troop is down,
 Down an' drownded by the ford.
    Ford, ford, ford o' Kabul river,
     Ford o' Kabul river in the dark!
    There's the river low an' fallin', but it ain't no use o' callin'
     'Cross the ford o' Kabul river in the dark.

Kipling Friday

Butterflies

Wireless” — Traffic and Discoveries


Eyes aloft, over dangerous places,
The children follow the butterflies,
And, in the sweat of their upturned faces,
Slash with a net at the empty skies.

So it goes they fall amid brambles,
And sting their toes on the nettle-tops,
Till, after a thousand scratches and scrambles,
They wipe their brows and the hunting stops.

Then to quiet them comes their father
And stills the riot of pain and grief,
Saying,  "Little ones,  go and gather
Out of my garden a cabbage-leaf.

"You will find on it whorls and clots of
Dull grey eggs that, properly fed,
Turn, by way of the worm, to lots of
Glorious butterflies raised from the dead."  .  .  .

"Heaven is beautiful, Earth is ugly,"
The three-dimensioned preacher saith;
So we must not look where the snail and the slug lie
For Psyche's birth.  .  .  .  And that is our death!

Kipling Friday

Dane-Geld

A.D. 980-1016

It is always a temptation to an armed and agile nation
  To call upon a neighbour and to say: --
"We invaded you last night--we are quite prepared to fight,
  Unless you pay us cash to go away."

And that is called asking for Dane-geld,
  And the people who ask it explain
That you've only to pay 'em the Dane-geld
  And then  you'll get rid of the Dane!

It is always a temptation for a rich and lazy nation,
  To puff and look important and to say: --
"Though we know we should defeat you, we have not the time to meet you.
  We will therefore pay you cash to go away."

And that is called paying the Dane-geld;
  But we've  proved it again and  again,
That if once you have paid him the Dane-geld
  You never get rid of the Dane.

It is wrong to put temptation in the path of any nation,
  For fear they should succumb and go astray;
So when you are requested to pay up or be molested,
  You will find it better policy to say: --

"We never pay any-one Dane-geld,
  No matter how trifling the cost;
For the end of that game is oppression and shame,
  And the nation that pays it is lost!"

Kipling Friday

For To Admire

The Injian Ocean sets an' smiles
 So sof', so bright, so bloomin' blue;
There aren't a wave for miles an' miles
 Excep' the jiggle from the screw.
The ship is swep', the day is done,
 The bugle's gone for smoke and play;
An' black ag'in the settin' sun
 The Lascar sings, "Hum deckty hai!"                 ["I'm looking out."]

For to admire an' for to see,
 For to be'old this world so wide --
It never done no good to me,
 But I can't drop it if I tried!

I see the sergeants pitchin' quoits,
 I 'ear the women laugh an' talk,
I spy upon the quarter-deck
 The orficers an' lydies walk.
I thinks about the things that was,
 An' leans an' looks acrost the sea,
Till, spite of all the crowded ship
 There's no one lef' alive but me.

The things that was which I 'ave seen,
 In barrick, camp, an' action too,
I tells them over by myself,
 An' sometimes wonders if they're true;
For they was odd -- most awful odd --
 But all the same, now they are o'er,
There must be 'eaps o' plenty such,
 An' if I wait I'll see some more.

Oh, I 'ave come upon the books,
 An' frequent broke a barrick-rule,
An' stood beside an' watched myself
 Be'avin' like a bloomin' fool.
I paid my price for findin' out,
 Nor never grutched the price I paid,
But sat in Clink without my boots,
 Admirin' 'ow the world was made.

Be'old a crowd upon the beam,
 An' 'umped above the sea appears
Old Aden, like a barrick-stove
 That no one's lit for years an' years!
I passed by that when I began,
 An' I go 'ome the road I came,
A time-expired soldier-man
 With six years' service to 'is name.

My girl she said, "Oh, stay with me!"
 My mother 'eld me to 'er breast.
They've never written none, an' so
 They must 'ave gone with all the rest --
With all the rest which I 'ave seen
 An' found an' known an' met along.
I cannot say the things I feel,
 And so I sing my evenin' song:

For to admire an' for to see,
 For to be'old this world so wide --
It never done no good to me,
 But I can't drop it if I tried!

Kipling Friday

Hunting-Song of the Seeonee Pack

(From The Jungle Book)

As the dawn was breaking the Sambhur belled --
         Once, twice and again!
And a doe leaped up, and a doe leaped up
From the pond in the wood where the wild deer sup.
This I, scouting alone, beheld,
         Once, twice, and again!

As the dawn was breaking the Sambhur belled --
         Once, twice and again!
And a wolf stole back, and a wolf stole back
To carry the word to the waiting Pack,
And we sought and we found and we bayed on his track
         Once, twice and again!

As the dawn was breaking the Wolf-Pack yelled
         Once, twice and again!
Feet in the jungle that leave no mark!
Eyes that can see in the dark -- the dark!
Tongue -- give tongue to it! Hark! O Hark!
         Once, twice and again!

His spots are the joy of the Leopard: his horns are the Buffalo's pride,
Be clean, for the strength of the hunter is known by the gloss of his hide.

If ye find that the bullock can toss you, or the heavy-browed Sambhur can gore;
Ye need not stop work to inform us; we knew it ten seasons before.

Oppress not the cubs of the stranger, but hail them as Sister and Brother,
For though they are little and fubsy, it may be the Bear is their mother.

"There is none like to me!" says the Cub in the pride of his earliest kill;
But the Jungle is large and the Cub he is small. Let him think and be still.

Kipling Friday

As the Bell Clinks

As I left the Halls at Lumley, rose the vision of a comely
Maid last season worshipped dumbly, watched with fervor from afar;
And I wondered idly, blindly, if the maid would greet me kindly.
That was all -- the rest was settled by the clinking tonga-bar.
Yea, my life and hers were coupled by the tonga coupling-bar.

For my misty meditation, at the second changing-station,
Suffered sudden dislocation, fled before the tuneless jar
Of a Wagner obbligato, scherzo, doublehand staccato,
Played on either pony's saddle by the clacking tonga-bar --
Played with human speech, I fancied, by the jigging, jolting bar.

"She was sweet," thought I, "last season, but 'twere surely wild unreason
Such tiny hope to freeze on as was offered by my Star,
When she whispered, something sadly: 'I -- we feel your going badly!'"
"And you let the chance escape you?" rapped the rattling tonga-bar.
"What a chance and what an idiot!" clicked the vicious tonga-bar.

Heart of man -- O heart of putty! Had I gone by Kakahutti,
On the old Hill-road and rutty, I had 'scaped that fatal car.
But his fortune each must bide by, so I watched the milestones slide by,
To "You call on Her to-morrow!" -- no fugue with cymbals by the bar --
You must call on Her to-morrow!" -- post-horn gallop by the bar.

Yet a further stage my goal on -- we were whirling down to Solon,
With a double lurch and roll on, best foot foremost, ganz und gar --
"She was very sweet," I hinted. "If a kiss had been imprinted?" --
"'Would ha' saved a world of trouble!" clashed the busy tonga-bar.
"'Been accepted or rejected!" banged and clanged the tonga-bar.

Then a notion wild and daring, 'spite the income tax's paring,
And a hasty thought of sharing -- less than many incomes are,
Made me put a question private, you can guess what I would drive at.
"You must work the sum to prove it," clanked the careless tonga-bar.
"Simple Rule of Two will prove it," lilted back the tonga-bar.

It was under Khyraghaut I mused. "Suppose the maid be haughty --
There are lovers rich -- and forty -- wait some wealthy Avatar?
Answer, monitor untiring, 'twixt the ponies twain perspiring!"
"Faint heart never won fair lady," creaked the straining tonga-bar.
"Can I tell you ere you ask Her?" pounded slow the tonga-bar.

Last, the Tara Devi turning showed the lights of Simla burning,
Lit my little lazy yearning to a fiercer flame by far.
As below the Mall we jingled, through my very heart it tingled --
Did the iterated order of the threshing tonga-bar --
Try your luck -- you can't do better!" twanged the loosened tongar-bar.

Kipling Friday

The King and the Sea

17TH JULY 1935

After His Realms and States were moved 
To bare their hearts to the King they loved, 
Tendering themselves in homage and devotion, 
The Tide Wave up the Channel spoke
To all those eager, exultant folk:-
"Hear now what Man was given you by the Ocean! 

"There was no thought of Orb or Crown
When the single wooden chest went down
To the steering-flat, and the careless Gunroom haled him 
To learn by ancient and bitter use,
How neither Favour nor Excuse,
Nor aught save his sheer self henceforth availed him. 

"There was no talk of birth or rank
By the slung hammock or scrubbed plank 
In the steel-grated prisons where 1 cast him; 
But niggard hours and a narrow space
For rest-and the naked light on his face-
While the ship's traffic flowed, unceasing, past him. 

"Thus I schooled him to go and come-
To speak at the word-at a sign be dumb; 
To stand to his task, not seeking others to aid him; 
To share in honour what praise might fall
For the task accomplished, and-over all-
To swallow rebuke in silence. Thus I made him. 

"I loosened every mood of the deep
On him, a child and sick for sleep,
Through the long watches that no time can measure, 
When I drove him, deafened and choked and blind, 
At the wave-tops cut and spun by the wind; 
Lashing him, face and eyes, with my displeasure.

"I opened him all the guile of the seas-
Their sullen, swift-sprung treacheries, 
To be fought, or forestalled, or dared, or dismissed with laughter.
I showed him Worth by Folly concealed, 
And the flaw in the soul that a chance revealed 
(Lessons remembered-to bear fruit thereafter). 
"I dealt him Power beneath his hand,
For trial and proof, with his first Command-
Himself alone, and no man to gainsay him. 
On him the End, the Means, and the Word, 
And the harsher judgment if he erred, 
And-outboard-Ocean waiting to betray him. 

"Wherefore, when he came to be crowned, 
Strength in Duty held him bound,
So that not Power misled nor ease ensnared him
Who had spared himself no more than his seas had spared him!"
.   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
After His Lieges, in all His Lands,
Had laid their hands between His hands,
And His ships thundered service and devotion, 
The Tide Wave, ranging the Planet, spoke 
On all Our foreshores as it broke:-
"Know now what Man 1 gave you-I, the Ocean!"

Kipling Friday

The King’s Pilgrimage

1922
King George V’s Visit to War Semeteries In France

OUR King went forth on pilgrimage
His prayers and vows to pay 
To them that saved our heritage 
And cast their own away.

And there was little show of pride,
Or prows of belted steel,
For the clean-swept oceans every side 
Lay free to every keel.

And the first land he found, it was shoal and banky ground-
Where the broader seas begin,
And a pale tide grieving at the broken harbour-mouth 
Where they worked the death-ships in.

And there was neither gull on the wing, 
Nor wave that could not tell
Of the bodies that were buckled in the life-buoy's ring 
That slid from swell to swell.

All that they had they gave-they gave; and they shall not return, 
For these are those that have no grave where any heart may mourn.

And the next land he found, it was low and hollow ground-
Where once the cities stood,
But the man-high thistle had been master of it all, 
Or the bulrush by the flood.

And there was neither blade of grass, 
Nor lone star in the sky,
But shook to see some spirit pass 
And took its agony.

And the next land he found, it was bare and hilly ground-
Where once the bread-corn grew,
But the fields were cankered and the water was defiled, 
And the trees were riven through.

And there was neither paved highway, 
Nor secret path in the wood,
But had borne its weight of the broken clay 
And darkened 'neath the blood.

Father and mother they put aside, and the nearer love also-
An hundred thousand men that died whose graves shall no man know.

And the last land he found, it was fair and level ground 
About a carven stone,
And a stark Sword brooding on the bosom of the Cross 
Where high and low are one.

And there was grass and the living trees, 
And the flowers of the spring,
And there lay gentlemen from out of all the seas 
That ever called him King.

'Twixt Nieuport sands and the eastward lands where the Four 
Red Rivers spring,
Five hundred thousand gentlemen of those that served their King 

All that they had they gave-they gave-
In sure and single faith.
There can no knowledge reach the grave 
To make them grudge their death 
Save only if they understood
That, after all was done,
We they redeemed denied their blood 
And mocked the gains it won.